October 2014 - Variable Speed Heat Pumps

posted Oct 2, 2014, 6:31 AM by Northern Indiana ASHRAE ASHRAE   [ updated Oct 13, 2014, 11:44 AM ]
Variable Speed Heat
Pumps in Cold Climates


Heat Pump technology can save substantial heating energy in a building, but has never been in favor in the Midwest.  Newer variable speed heat pump technology is starting to change all of that.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand how a heat pump works for space heating and cooling
  2. Compare the differences between single/dual stage heat pumps and variable speed heat pumps
  3. Understand heat pump operation in cold Midwestern climates
  4. Learn how a heat pump can be used in conjunction with a gas furnace or boiler to "get the best of both worlds" in a dual-fuel system
  5. Discuss heat pump water heaters and Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Systems

About the Presenter
Ryan R. Hoger, LEED AP, has been with Temperature Equipment Corp. since 1997. He was the 2007-08 president of the Illinois ASHRAE Chapter and is actively involved with several ASHRAE and gas/electric utility committees. He has extensive experience with building automation systems (BAS), energy recovery ventilators (ERV), variable refrigerant flow (VRF), demand controlled ventilation (DCV), and other energy conserving HVAC systems. Ryan has written several HVAC articles for various publications and has a Bachelor of Science degree in General Engineering from the University of Illinois. He can be contacted at ryan.hoger@tecmungo.com.

Thursday, October 9, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CDT
Register Now

Continuing Education
The LIVE version of this session qualifies for 1 PDH for Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin PEs.  In order to receive a PDH certificate, each attendee must be registered and logged in on a separate computer or tablet.  Additionally, the attendee needs to answer the live poll ques tons during the presentation and "participate" in the webinar.  GoToWebinar uses a metric called "Interest Rating" for each attendee to determine participation.  This statistic is computed from a proprietary algorithm that evaluates each attendee's interactions on a scale of 1 to 100 (100 being best). Factors that contribute to the Interest Rating include, but are not limited to, attendance length, attentiveness during the session (not multi-tasking on email, etc.), number of questions asked and an attendee's successful completion of polls, surveys and registration.

Sponsors
Nothern Indiana ASHRAE
Temperature Equipment Corporation
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